Skip to content

95 (Kosher Part 1 | カーシェール1)

February 25, 2011

Meat section in a supermarket | スーパーのお肉売り場

This entry is the second of a new weekly series called Food Fridays.
Every Friday I will post an entry related to food or cooking.
この記事は毎週更新予定の新カテゴリー「Food Fridays(フード・フライデー)」の第二弾。
毎週金曜日、食べ物もしくは料理関連の記事をアップします。

Food Fridays: Kosher (Part 1)

It is well known that Hindus don’t eat beef and Muslims don’t eat pork. This seems pretty straightforward, doesn’t it? But the more and more I learn about Kosher, or the Jewish dietary laws, the more complicated it seems to get.

I should note here in the beginning that I’m not going to attempt laying out the rules of Kosher here. I don’t practice it and am by no means an expert on it, and there are far better resources available online and elsewhere on the subject. Besides, I have a feeling many of my dear readers actually know more about Kosher than I do. Instead, I would like to share my personal experiences and relationship with Kosher here in Israel.

First of all, I still have a hard time getting used to the fact that Kosher laws are based on the Bible. In other words, rules determined by God. I grew up in a non-religious household and my native Japanese culture is in most part a non-religious society. It was rare if at all for religious literature or a “God” of any kind to be referenced in daily life, let alone influence what we ate.

I was more exposed to the presence and idea of religion when my family lived in the United States for 6 years, and therefore became more familiar with the existence of the Bible (although in the Michigan suburb I lived in the “Bible” mostly meant the New Testament). But to me, the Bible back then to until recently, was a book people read in churches or at home when they wanted to be “religious”. Not a book that influences my daily life like say, the dinner table, the supermarket, or wedding receptions. Never were my decisions on what I wanted to eat influenced by any God and what he/she deemed right or wrong.

We currently live in a secular kibbutz, so it’s actually rare to meet anyone that strictly follows Kosher around here. But even the most secular people can tell you the Kosher rules and the reasons behind them. It’s not unusual for their answer to a Kosher-related question of mine to be, “Because God said so.” This never fails to throw me off. A big culture shock, I must say.

So, which influences of what “God said” have I noticed in Israel? The first was the absence of pork in supermarkets, meat shops, and most restaurants. For those of you new to Kosher, pork is not only banned from the Muslim diet (as I mentioned in the beginning) but from the Jewish diet too. (And to be fair, as Yuval always likes to remind me, the Old Testament came much earlier than the Koran!) It is deemed a foul animal in the bible and therefore not kosher. Ham, bacon, pepperoni, prosciutto, pork cutlets… I’ve never seen them here to this day. They apparently aren’t completely unavailable in Israel, but as my old neighbor Ilan once said to me, “You have to know where to go.”

God also says more than once in the bible that “you should not cook a fawn in its mother’s milk”. Apparently, in the beginning this was literally taken as a decree but over the years have come to be interpreted more as a metaphor. Still all beasts (mammals such as cows, goats, lambs) were determined not to be eaten with dairy, and in the modern day today, all meat including chicken are not to be mixed with dairy to avoid confusion.

The more obvious consequences of this rule sunk in pretty quickly. I’ve never been to a McDonald’s in Israel but I imagine there are no cheeseburgers on the menu, no sausage McMuffins. Pepperoni or bacon that were common toppings on pizza back home are probably rare here. No meat with cream sauce, and I guess no bacon with ice cream if I ever have such a craving. There are probably many other things I am missing out on, but it’s probably a good thing that I can’t remember them.🙂

The less obvious consequences of this milk and dairy rule took longer for me to realize. For example, it took me five weddings in Israel before I realized that food at weddings have to be either “meat” or “dairy”. The more common choice seems to be “meat”, and the most serious consequence of this, in my opinion, is that the desserts are all Kosher Parve. Parve is food without any meat or dairy ingredients. This means no butter used in dessert. No real milk for the cappuccino you request with it. They use a substitute for milk that even most of the Israelis at my table avoided drinking. With butter-free desserts and mysterious white fluff topped coffee, the world suddenly becomes a sad, sad, place, let me tell you.

I hate to leave you on a sad note but this entry is already very long and my mind feels like it’s about to explode with Kosher information overload. The thing is, I’ve barely chipped off the Kosher iceberg! I will pick it up again next Friday, and probably many other Fridays but hopefully with some breaks in between. Until then, have a great weekend my friends. I hope you’re having a wonderful culinary experience, under whatever laws it may be.

ヒンズー教徒は牛肉を食べない、イスラム教徒は豚肉を食べないことは良く知られていますよね。至って単純なルールに感じます。でもユダヤ教の食事規定の「カーシェール」は、知れば知るほど複雑に感じてしまうのです。

本題に入る前にお伝えしたいのは、このエントリーでカージェールとは何か、規定はどういうものかなどを細かく紹介するのではなく、私のカーシェールにまつわる個人的な体験や想いを綴りたいと思います。なぜならば私はカーシェールを守っていないし、知識が豊富なわけでもありません。それにこのブログを読んでくださる皆様の中に私よりはるかにカーシェールについて知っている人がいると思うし!(もしカーシェールの正式な規定などを知りたい場合は、オンラインを始め資料は手に入りやすいですよ。)

まずカーシェールで何よりびっくりしたのは、規定が聖書に基づいていること。つまり、神様が決めた規定だということ。「食卓」と「神様」が絡むことはいつまでたっても慣れないかもしれません。私が生まれ育った環境は宗教の存在がなかったと同然だし、日本社会も宗教色は強くないですよね。宗教の本や文学、又は「神様」が日常生活の中で引用されることはほとんどありませんでした。何を食べるかを影響するなんて想像もしなかった。

父親の転勤のため家族とアメリカに6年間住んだ時、宗教の存在や意味をもっと身近に感じることができ、よって聖書のことも前より頻繁にみたり聞いたりしました(私が住んでいたミシガン州の住宅地では「聖書」と言うとほとんど「新約聖書」でしたが)。でも私の中で聖書と言えばつい最近までは人々が「教会やお家などで宗教と向き合いたい時に読む本」でした。食卓、買い物をするスーパー、お呼ばれした結婚式など、私の日常生活を影響する本ではまさかなかった。また無限の「神様」が世界中に存在するかもしれないけれど、私が口にする食べ物とは無関係、、、だったはず。

現在セキュラー(宗教的でない)色の強いキブツに住んでいることもあって、ちゃんとカーシェールを守っている人には全くと言っていいほど遭遇しません。でも、極度の非宗教的な人でも、大抵カーシェールの規定や規定の理由は知っています。私のカーシェールに関する質問に対して、「神様が決めたことだから」のような答えが返ってくることもめずらしくありません。このように非宗教的な人でさえ「神様」をさらっと答えに取り入れる、これは毎回びっくりし、カルチャーショックを受けます。

イスラエルに来てから、「神様が決めた」食事規定に私はどのような影響を受けたかと言えば、まず気付いたのは豚肉をスーパー、お肉屋さん、レストランなどで全くみないこと。カーシェールに馴染みのある方はもうご存知だと思いますが、豚肉は最初に述べたようにイスラム教で禁じられているだけでなく、ユダヤ教でも禁じられているのです。(そしてユバルがいつも私に言うことが、旧約聖書のほうがコーランよりはるかに古い!だそうです。)旧約聖書の中で豚は不潔な動物とされているためカーシェールではないのです。ハム、ベーコン、サラミ、生ハムなど、未だにイスラエルで見たことはありません。全く手に入らないわけではないそうですが、特定なお店を知らない限り日常的には手に入りません。

次に、神様が聖書に定めた規定に「子山羊をその母の乳で煮てはならない」があります。昔はこの規定は文字通りに受け止められていたそうですが、いずれ比喩として用いられるようになったそうです。でも獣類(哺乳類の牛、山羊、羊など)は全て乳製品と混ぜないとされ、近代では混雑を避けるためにも鳥を含む全ての肉類は乳製品と混ぜないようになったそうです。

この規定の明らかな影響は例えば、まだイスラエルでマクドナルドに行ったことはないけれど、恐らくメニューにチーズバーガーはないでしょう。日本ではピザの定番のトッピングのハムやペペロニもなし。お肉をホワイトソースやクリームソースに絡めるのもなし、そしてもしある日ベーコンとアイスクリームを一緒に食べたくなっても(?!)ここイスラエルでは無理でしょう。ほかにもたくさん例があるのでしょうが、思い出せないことは逆に幸い?笑

この肉・乳製品の規定の影響でかなり時間がたってから気付いたこともありました。例えば、イスラエルで5回目に出席した結婚式でやっと、食事が「肉」もしくは「乳製品」のどちらかに限られていることを発見。人気があるのは「肉」ですが、これから影響を受けるものと言えばデザート。肉・乳製品両方を含まない「カーシェール・パルヴェ」でなければいけないのです。つまり、ケーキにバターは含まれてはいけない。一緒に頼むカプチーノも、ミルクは禁止。植物性の代用品が使われるのですが、これは大半のイスラエル人も拒否していました。バターなしのデザート、正体不明の白いクリームが乗っかったコーヒー、、、世界は一気に暗くなるものです。

暗くなったところでおしまいにするのもなんですが、既にものすご〜く長いエントリーになってしまったし、私の頭もカーシェールのことでパンクしちゃいそうです。でも残念なことにカーシェールの規定、ほとんどかじっていません。また来週続きを書きたいと思います。数週間に渡って書いても書ききれない気がしますが、たまには休憩してほかの話題を取り入れながらいきたいと思います。では皆様良い週末を。どんな規定内外であれ、おいしい食事をされていますよう!

Much love,
Kaori

No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: