Skip to content

Holocaust Remembrance Day (Yuval’s version) | ホロコースト記念日、ユバル版

April 9, 2013

Yuval was driving through the West Bank on his route to Tel Aviv yesterday at the time of the the 10am siren. I’ve ridden on the route with him before, and it’s not a busy one. Sometimes many minutes can go by without passing a single car.

He told me that when the siren rang (on the radio only, as they were in the West Bank), there was another car that was just about to pass him on the opposite side of the road. There were three salesmen looking people inside, and they all stepped out of the car for the siren.

During the two minutes, a few more cars came by, perhaps those who didn’t have the radio on but upon seeing Yuval and the other car stopped, until there were about 6 to 7 cars in total. The cars that didn’t stop and kept on driving were the Arabs and the Orthodox Jews.

Did you pause for a minute there too? The Arabs I understand, but I was shocked to hear about the Orthodox. To put a very complicated issue short (“Don’t get me started,” said Yuval), the Orthodox do not observe Holocaust Remembrance Day because it is a day created by the state of Israel. The state of Israel is considered an abomination by the Orthodox. Since the state is man-made and not made by God, it is delaying the arrival of the Messiah and creating a true kingdom of God in the land of Israel. They apparently don’t observe the siren for the upcoming Memorial Day honoring soldiers lost in war, either.

They reject the idea of Israel yet still choose to live here and have no problems accepting all the benefits the state offers them, like tax cuts, subsidies for their children, scholarships for men studying in Yeshivas, exemption from the army, and so on.

Another example to show just how complicated Israel is.

On a different note, I would like to share a powerful video by my friend kaie that shows a more united observation of the siren (below the Japanese text):

昨日10時にサイレンが鳴った時、
ユバルはテルアビブへ向かう途中で西岸地区にいた。
何度か同じルートを彼と一緒に走ったことがあるが、
ほとんどガラガラ状態である。
数分間ほかの車をみないことは普通だ。

サイレンが鳴った時(西岸地区なのでラジオのみ)
ちょうど対向車線から車が一台通り過ぎるところだった。
セールスマンぽい人が3人乗っていて、彼らは全員車から降りた。

二分間の間に、ラジオをつけていなかったため10時になったことを気付かなかったのか、
ユバルともう一台の車をみて止まった車が最終的には6、7台いたとのこと。
止まらず通り過ぎていったのはアラブ人が乗った車と、正統派ユダヤ教徒が乗った車。

これを聞いて皆様も一瞬目を疑っただろうか?
私はアラブ人はもちろんわかるけど、正統派ユダヤ人が止まらないなんて?
これはとても複雑な話だがユバルのウルトラ短縮版によると、
ホロコースト記念日はイスラエル国が決めた日なので正統派は守らないとのこと。
なぜならば正統派にとってイスラエルという国は醜態なのだそうだ。
イスラエル国は神様によってではなく人工的につくられたため、
彼らが待ち受けている救世主の到来と、
神による純粋な王国の設立を妨げているのだそう。
正統派は来週の戦没者追悼記念日のサイレンも守らないみたいだ。

彼らはイスラエルという国は認めないけど、それでもここに住んでいるし、
国から与えられる減税、子供手当、宗教を勉強している男性に対する奨学金、兵役免除など、
様々な援助や福祉手当は受け取っている。

イスラエルという国がどれだけ複雑かを実感させられる例の一つだ。

話題は変わるが、以下のビデオはブログ友達のkaie
アップロードしたホロコースト記念日のサイレン時のビデオ。
こちらはユバル版よりはるかに結束している:

Much love,
Kaori

Holocaust Remembrance Day

April 8, 2013

One of my co-workers showed up wearing all black to work today, and I immediately wondered if I should have too. But then to my relief my boss and other co-worker came wearing their usual clothes.

I found myself feeling a mixture of dread and nervousness towards the siren all morning. I don’t know how my co-workers can take it. It was a very emotional 2 minutes for me as it was last year. Perhaps after standing through the siren for over 30 years, you get used to it.

Today is one of those dusty, smoggy days when I can’t see the mountains in the distance. This place can use some rain, but since it feels somewhere between spring and summer now I won’t be surprised if we don’t see a drop for the next 4 or 5 months.

今日はイスラエルのホロコースト記念日。
職場に着いたら仕事仲間が黒ずくめの格好をしていた。
私もそうするべきだったかと焦ったけど、後から出勤してきた上司ともう一人の仕事仲間は
いつも通りの格好をしていたのでほっとした。

10時に鳴る2分間のサイレンに対して不安と緊張を感じる自分がいた。
去年と同様、仕事仲間達はサイレンの前後はいつも通りに振る舞い、
さらっとした感じだった。
でも私にとってはなぜかとても感情的で、辛い2分間なのだ。
仕事仲間達はもう30年以上毎年経験しているから、感情がこみ上げるようなことはないのだろうか。

今日は近くの山がみえないほどほこりっぽかった。
雨が降ったらありがたいけど、もう雨の季節は去り、
今は春と夏の間のように感じる。
だからこれから4、5ヶ月ぐらい雨が降らないことは全然ありえるのだ。

Much love,
Kaori

Holocaust Remembrance Day Eve

April 7, 2013

Today is the eve of Holocaust Remembrance Day. At work my boss asked me if I remembered, and I said of course, but then she mentioned that everything will be closed from around early evening today, and I realized I actually didn’t remember that. Last year the 2-minute long siren on the actual Remembrance Day left such a strong impression on me (the entry I wrote about it is here and the entry with a stunning video of the siren is here) that I had forgotten about all the stores closing down.

Yuval should be on the road tomorrow when the siren goes off. I wonder what his experience will be like.

Much love,
Kaori

Movies on my mind

April 6, 2013
tags: ,

Today was a very movie-heavy day. In the morning, while I caught up on my weekend online reading, I came across a few articles about American movie critic Roger Ebert who passed away earlier this week. The New York Times obituary and Roger Ebert’s Twenty Best Reviews were my favorites. I’m sad to have not known Mr. Ebert’s articles when he was alive, but I am sure I will be visiting his website in the future. I am always looking for interesting movies to watch, and there is nothing like a good, thoughtful review that will enhance the whole movie experience.

In the afternoon I watched The Kid With A Bike. Since the preview alone had made me tear up I had very high expectations, and while the film was still very good, it wasn’t as good as I had hoped. I would say 3.5 out of 5 stars.

I also started to watch Beauty is Embarrassing, a documentary about artisit Wayne White, but I only got through about half. I really enjoyed what I’ve seen so far though.

I hope you’re having a great weekend, my friends.

Much love,
Kaori

Rainbow for your weekend.

April 5, 2013

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Not a bad sight to see first thing in the morning.
朝一番にみるのに決して悪くない景色。

How was your week, my friends? Mine went by in a blur. Mid-week marked the end of Passover break, but even before Passover was over people were already starting to talk about Yom Ha’atzumaut (Isareli Independence Day), which is in a little over a week.

You may have noticed the number of posts have suddenly hiked up around here. I’ve decided to challenge myself to write a post every day for a year, starting April 1st. (April 1st is the beginning of fiscal and academic years in Japan so I felt it was a good time to start, since I missed January 1st!) I’ve created a new category called Daily Words 2013-14.
Edited to add: I was only able to keep up this mission for 2 weeks! Oh well. I will continue to try to post as often as I can. (19 April 2013)

I hope you have a great weekend, my friends.

皆様の一週間はいかがでしたか?
私はあっという間に過ぎた感じでした。
今週の半ばにペサハの祝日が終了しましたが、
終了する前からもう次の大きな祝日であるイスラエルの独立記念日の
話をする人もいました(祝日は約一週間弱後)。

ここ数日の間にいきなりエントリーの数が増えましたが、
4月1日から1年間、毎日文章を中心としたエントリーを更新することに
チャレンジしようと思います。
(1月1日は逃してしまったので、
日本でいう新学期・新年の意味で4月1日はいい日だと思って)
新カタゴリーDaily Words 2013-14も設定しました。

追伸:このチャレンジは2週間続けるのがやっとでした!
やれやれ。でもできるだけ今後も更新を目指したいと思ってます。(2013年4月19日)

では皆様良い週末を!

Much love,
Kaori

When you stop caring | どうでもよくなる時

April 4, 2013

A random thought occurred to me today about the older generation of the people I see every day in the kibbutz. When does one stop caring, and for what reason?

This can of course be interpreted in many ways, for many things, but today I’m specifically talking about appearance and how one presents him or herself.

I first thought about the ladies and recalled a Japanese article I once read somewhere that was about when “a woman stops being a woman”. It said this can happen regardless of menopause; it happens when a woman stops caring.

In a place like a kibbutz where we’re surrounded by agriculture and it’s a fairly simple life style, I think it’s easier to stop caring. But I see many ladies who put in the effort and take good care of themselves. And it’s not about being stylish or good at applying makeup or having a lot of money for those things. Regardless of good or bad taste, makeup or no makeup, or the amount of money spent, there’s a difference between someone who still cares and someone who has pretty much let go.

The more I think about it, this really doesn’t only have to do with the older generation. I think it can happen at almost any age. So the question is, what keeps a person caring? I think the Japanese article I mentioned earlier basically said that once a woman stops feeling the desire to be attractive to the opposite sex (and I want to add, to the same sex if that is your preference) is when one stops caring. But I think it’s a bit more deeper than that.

Even among the men, there are those who are well in to their pension years in the kibbutz that wear a crisp button down shirt and slacks every day. For them, I wonder if some of it has to do with habit. Maybe they actually feel more comfortable in those clothes than say, sweatpants and a tank top?

Now I’m really self conscious all of a sudden. I certainly don’t put nearly as much effort or be creative with my appearance now as I once did in Tokyo, but I hope I don’t look like I’ve “let go”!

キブツで毎日見る高年齢の人達について、今日ふとした疑問が頭の中に浮かんだ。
「どうでもよくなる時」はいつ、そしてなぜ、訪れるのだろう?

これはもちろん色んなことに例えられるが、
私が今回疑問に思ったのは外見、身だしなみのこと。

まず女性のことを考えた時、少し前にどこかで読んだ
「女性が女性でなくなる時」のような内容の記事を思い出した。
これは更年期には関係なく、女性が「どうでもよくなった時」に起こると書いてあった気がする。

畑や牧場に囲まれ、シンプルなライフスタイルが主流なキブツでは
どうでもよくなりやすくても仕方ないと思う。
でも努力をいれているな、と思う女性はたくさんいる。
ファッショナブルであるとか、お化粧が上手であるとか、
そのためにどれだけお金をかけているかということを言っているのではない。
センスの善し悪しに関わらず、お化粧をしていようがしてなかろうが、
努力をいれる人とどうでもよくなった人の間には明らかな違いがでると思う。

これは考えれば考えるほど、実は高年齢の人達だけに関する問題ではないと思う。
どの世代でもどうでもよくなる可能性はあると思う。
そこで疑問なのは、努力をし続ける人は何がその努力のもとになっているのか?ということ。
前の記事には男性に魅力的に写りたいという欲望がなくなった時、
(同性が好きな人は同性)
女性は女性でなくなる、というようなことが書いてあった気がするけど、
実際はそれよりもっと複雑なのだと思う。

キブツの男性の中にも、毎日きりっとしたワイシャツとズボンをはく人がいる。
彼らにとっては、昔の習慣も関係しているのかもしれない。
ジャージとランニングシャツよりもそのほうが楽なのかも。

こんなことを書いていたら、自分のことも心配になってきた。
キブツに来てからは東京にいた時と比べて断然おしゃれなんてしなくなったし
工夫をしたりすることも少なくなったけど
「どうでもよくなった」ふうにみえないように気をつけなくては。

Much love,
Kaori

The Israeli men around me

April 3, 2013

ここ最近、ランドリーの仕事は朝6時に始まる。
祝日の後はいつも忙しく、普段より朝早く始まり終了時間も普段より遅い。

昨日に引き続き、上司の弟でもある仕事仲間が
(彼は仕事上私より更に早く来ている)
ちょうど私が到着した頃職場のキッチンで
せっせとコーヒーを三人分用意している。
私と、上司と、忙しい時に手伝ってくれる上司(と彼の)お母さんの分だ。

昨日も用意してくれたのだが、その時は本人もコーヒーを飲んでいたので
自分の分を用意するついでにみんなの分も用意してくれたのだと思っていた。
でも今日は彼自身は飲んでいなかったけど、
わざわざ私たちの分を、しかも出勤するタイミングに合わせて用意してくれたのだ。

これは実は彼として決してめずらしいことではない。
ま、彼の気分やひま加減にもよるのだけど(笑)
頼んでもいないのに気付いたらコーヒーが入ってたり、
仕事が長引いている日にちょうどタイミングが抜群の時に
「カフェ(コーヒー)?」と皆に問いかけることは良くあること。
気が利き、手際が良いのだ。

上司の旦那さんもこの面では似ている。
彼が休みの日などに私たちの職場にコーヒーを飲みに来ることがあるのだけど、
その時は皆の分をいれてくれる。

ユバルも家でいつも「何か飲みたい?コーヒー?紅茶?」と聞いてくれるし、
お客さんが来た時にはほとんどの場合彼が手際良く飲み物を用意する。

これはイスラエル人男性に共通することなのか、
それともキブツ出身のイスラエル人男性の共通点なのか??

ちなみにもう一つ気付いた上司の弟と旦那さんの共通点は、
彼らは二人とも大の犬好きで、そして犬にもめちゃくちゃ人気があること。
普段は男らしいけど子犬なんかが職場にはいってきたら大変。
(キブツ内には多くの放し飼いの犬がいる。)
彼らが子供のように(というか子犬のように)犬に接するからあれだけ好かれるのかな?
理由はともあれ、これはイスラエル人であることには関係ないでしょう。

I’ve been going in to the laundry at 6am for the last few days. It gets really busy after any major holiday, always resulting in earlier starts and longer hours.

When I arrived at work today my boss’s brother, who also works with us (and due to his duties arrives earlier than any of us), was busy making three cups of coffee. One for me, another for my boss, and the third for his mom, who helps us out when it’s busy.

Yesterday he did the same thing, but he was also drinking a cup himself so I figured he made for everyone else along with his own. But today he wasn’t drinking himself, yet he went through the trouble of making everyone coffee (catered to each person’s preference) just around the time that we were all arriving.

This is not at all unusual for him. It does depend on his mood or how busy or not busy he is, but there has been plenty of times in the past when he made a cup of coffee for me when I didn’t even ask for it, or on long busy days he would call out to everyone, “Cafe?” at the perfect timing.

My boss’s husband is also like this. On his days off he sometimes comes in to have a cup of coffee in the morning and makes drinks for everyone. Yuval also is always asking me at home if I want to drink something, and when we have guests he’s often the one making everyone’s drinks.

So I can’t help but wonder (channeling Carrie Bradshaw here), is this a common quality in Israeli men?

Or is it a common quality in Israeli men living in kibbutzim??

Another thing I realized my boss’s brother and husband have in common are their love for dogs and the love from dogs they get in return. There are many dogs walking around in the kibbutz on any given day and it’s amazing how much they all love the two men. This on the other hand, I’m sure has nothing to do with being Israeli or a kibbutznik.

Much love,
Kaori

Good luck hand-me-down

April 2, 2013

先日ランドリーで洗濯物を受け取ったある男性が、
「君は日本出身だったよね?」と聞いてきた。
そしてなんとなくしかわからなかったけど恐らく、
日本のお土産をもらったが何かよくわからないので、
今度持って来るから何か教えてくれ、と言われた。

そうしたら数日後にあたる今日、本当にもってきた。
彼の手元には二つのお守り。
一つは典型的なお守りで前には神社名(忘れちゃったけど)、
そして裏には「婦」と書いてあった。
もう一つは小さな絵馬で、「安産祈願」と書いてあった。

なのでまずお守りであることを説明し
(と言ってもヘブライ語では到底無理なので英語で
「good luck charm」と訳してしまったけど、これもちょっと違う気がする)
恐らく「婦」と書いてあるものは女性用(?これも不確か)、
そして「安産祈願」の意味も説明した。

そうしたら彼は笑いながら、
「娘にあげようと思っても、彼女は僕の知ってる限り妊娠してないし、、、」と言い、
突然、「じゃあ君にあげよう!」と言った。
「私も妊娠してないよ、」と伝えたが、「今後のために」と強引に渡されてしまった。

昔仕事で海外から来日中のお客さんを明治神宮に連れて行った時、
お守りがすごく気に入ってたくさん買い込んでいた人がいたのを思い出した。
確かにきれいだし、かわいいし、いいお土産になるのだろう。
でもそれが「合格祈願」であろうが「安産祈願」であろうが
「交通安全」であろうが関係なく、その人は完全に柄や色で選んでいた。
恐らく今日の男性の友達もそのようにしてお守りを買ってきたのだろう。

私はとっさにお守りを神社へいずれお返ししなくてはならないことを考え、
この「好意」をちょっと重く感じてしまったのだけれど、
このような複雑なことを説明するのはなかなか難しいことだ。
この心理は日本人にしかわからないことかも?

今日はこのちょっとした不思議な事件から始まったのだった。

A kibbutz member who was dropping off his laundry the other day asked me, “You are from Japan, right?” When I confirmed, he went on to tell me what I loosely understood as, a friend brought him some gifts from Japan but he doesn’t know what they are, and he wants me to look at them.

Only a few days later today, he actually brought the gifts. In his hands were two omamori, something I described as “good luck charms” in English, but that didn’t quite feel right. Wikipedia defines it as Japanese amulets (charms, talismans) commonly sold at religious sites and dedicated to particular Shinto deities as well as Buddhist figures, and may serve to provide various forms of luck or protection.

One omamori was what I consider the most standard with the shrine name in the front. In the back was the symbol for “woman” or “wife”, which I have never seen before. The other one was a miniature ema with wishes for an easy labor.

So I explained this to him and upon hearing “easy labor” he laughed and said, “Well, I thought of giving it to my daughter but she is not pregnant, at least to my knowledge…” and then suddenly, “Maybe you should have it!” I quickly replied that I’m not pregnant either, but with his mind apparently set he insisted I take it, for when I will need it.

This reminded me of a time when I was working in Tokyo and took some clients to the famous Meiji Shrine in Harajuku. One of them fell for the omamori hard and bought a ton of them. But whether they were for “doing well in school entrance exams” or “easy pregnancy” or “safety on the road” obviously did not matter to her; she was choosing solely based on the design, colors, fabric patterns. I imagine the friend of the kibbutz member also bought the omamoris that way.

But to me, a omamori is not simply just a “good luck charm”. I am not religious by any means but I still feel a responsibility when owning a omamori; to treat it well and with respect, and if and when the time comes to bid farewell to it I couldn’t possibly just throw it in the trash. I would want to take it back to the shrine it came from, which is the proper way from my knowledge.

So, this random act of kindness of the kibbutz member actually came with a bit of weight, a complicated weight that is hard to explain. Maybe the kind of weight that can only truly be understood by the Japanese? I don’t know.

This unusual incident was what started my otherwise pretty usual day.

Much love,
Kaori

Hangover Haze

April 1, 2013

Today was the second Passover holiday and it felt like Shabbat (Saturday). For the past nearly two weeks we have not left the kibbutz because tourists flock to this area during high holidays, causing heavy traffic on the roads. But all this staying put definitely has had a toll on us, and we decided to try going on a drive.

Yuval wanted to get some plants for the garden so we stopped by our favorite Arab restaurant on the way to the nursery. Some of the guys there recognize us by now since we go there about once a month. The waiters were really laid back today, a few often coming together to the table next to us and chatting. Maybe they were over staffed, or maybe it was because of the Jewish holiday, I don’t know. Our waiter stuck around a few times long after he brought or cleared something, talking with Yuval in a mixture of Arabic and Hebrew.

We only see these guys in their crisp white button down shirts and black pants, but I found myself wondering today what they look like in normal clothes, what kind of lives they lead outside of the restaurant. Our waiter asked Yuval whether today was a holiday and which one it was. In my life it’s impossible to miss when Passover is or what kind of holiday it is, but for our waiter’s community today is just another day and schools are in session and businesses are open. Within this small country, there are so many separate worlds.

As the title suggests the majority of today was spent in a hangover haze. We don’t drink nearly as we used to anymore, cutting down alcohol consumption to twice a week, but last night we went a little overboard at the BBQ over at Yuval’s brother’s. “Aperitif” drinks involving tequila followed by lots of red wine… a mix with obvious consequences.

Much love,
Kaori

Long time!

March 18, 2013

*I originally planned to post this last Friday.
It looks like it’ll take a while for me to get used to the pace of blogging again…
*このエントリーは本当は先週の金曜日にアップする予定でした。
ブログの投稿ペースに再び慣れるのにまだ時間がかかりそう、、、。

Flower field in the West Bank | 西岸地区の花畑

Flower field in the West Bank 1 | 西岸地区の花畑1

20130209FieldB

Flower field in the West Bank 2 | 西岸地区の花畑2

These photos of a flower field in the West Bank were taken this past February. What was the most stunning to me, even more than the sight or the smell, was the deafening buzz of the bugs.

この西岸地区の花畑の写真は今年2月のものです。風景よりもにおいよりも印象に残っているのはまるで吸い込まれそうだった虫の鳴き声。

* * * * * * * * * *

How have you been, my friends? I have let so much time pass by since my last post that I almost feel like a stranger here writing on my own blog! Slowly and surely I want to get re-acquainted with this space again, and hopefully, with you too.

So far my year has felt both dynamic and slow, with wide gaps between the eventful and uneventful.

In the beginning (literally on the 1st of January) one of my co-workers’ father passed away, and I attended my first Jewish funeral as well as my first funeral in Israel. We had some intense rain that month, making the ground overflow with water like I’ve never seen. Even lawns were filled with puddles, and many sidewalks were under water.

In February, I took a week-long trip to Japan for the freelance work I’ve been doing since last September. This business trip materialized in a matter of days and I didn’t even contact any of my friends this time, knowing I wouldn’t have the time or mental space to go and see any of them.

As with all trips to Japan, I had a hard time adjusting back to life in Israel for a while after I return. I was better this time around, having just gone through it only two months ago. But sometimes I feel like I am going back and forth between two completely separate worlds.

This week, my boss at the laundry was in my thoughts a lot. Her son left for the army on Sunday. Soldiers are part of the every day landscape here in Israel, but I think I will look at them with different eyes from now on. The date of my boss’s son’s departure had been written on the work calendar for at least 6 months, and it had been talked about from much earlier. My boss had blocked off a week or so afterwards for “very needed recovery”.

In these last few weeks leading up to it, I got a sense of just how difficult this day was going to be for her not just from how she acted and talked about it but from how everyone else treated her and the subject. On the actual day, we at work knew my boss and her family went to see him off at the bus station, and my heart crushed just thinking about it. The next day my co-worker told me she had tried to call my boss the night before, only to be told she was already in bed at 8:30.

I wasn’t sure how she was going to be back at work, or even if she was going to come back any time soon, but only two days later she turned up, mostly her usual self. She was able to talk about how difficult it was, especially when cleaning up her son’s room after he left.

But after all this drama? He’s already back in the kibbutz for the weekend, only 4 days later! They told me he will only be returning every few weeks, but from how they acted I thought he won’t be back for a while.

This is what makes me feel like I will never look at a soldier the same way again, though. Just because almost every mother has to send her child to the army in Israel doesn’t exactly make it any easier, and I imagine every reunion doesn’t make saying goodbye each time less harder either.

My other co-worker whose only daughter will be going to the army in 2 years is already talking about getting a dog.

I hope you’ve been well, my friends.

皆様、お元気でしたか?
ブログに投稿するの久しぶりすぎて、自分のブログなのに
他の人のスペースにお邪魔しているような(?)不思議な気分!
でもずっとブログのことは頭の隅にあり、また復活したいなと思っていたので
少しずつまた更新していけたらと思ってます。

今年は今のところ多忙な時期と全くそうでない時期を行ったり来たりで、
あまりにも広いギャップの間をさまよっているような気分です。

1月の初め(正真正銘の1日目)にはランドリーの仕事仲間のお父さんが亡くなり、
初めてのユダヤ教のお葬式、そしてイスラエルに来てから初めてとなるお葬式に参列しました。
1月は何度か大雨が降り、今までに見たことのないくらいそこら中に水があふれていました。
芝生上にまで水たまりがたくさんでき、キブツ内の歩道の多くも水に覆われていました。

2月には去年の9月からフリーランスで働いている仕事の関係でまた一週間日本へ出張。
今回は短いし時間的にも精神的にも余裕がなかったので仕事以外で会ったのは両親と兄のみ。
友達には一人にも連絡できませんでした。

一時帰国後はいつものことなのですが、
精神的にも肉体的にも平常通りになるまでに時間がかかります。
今回は去年の12月に帰ったばっかりというのもあってそれほど大変じゃなかったけど
日本での生活とイスラエルの生活、余りにも離れ過ぎていて、
ある意味おもしろいのだけど、なんでここまで別世界なのかな?とも思ってしまいます。
あと、正直、やっぱり日本がいいなぁ〜。

そしてこの一週間はランドリーの上司のことが良く頭にありました。
彼女の長男が日曜日にアーミーに向けて出発したんです。
イスラエルでは兵士は日常的に良く見かけるけれど、
これからは今までとは違った視点で見ると思います。
上司の息子さんの出発日は職場のカレンダーにも最低6ヶ月前からメモってあった気がするし、
初めて話題にあがったのはそれよりもっとはるか前。
そして出発前後の約一週間半ほどは上司は「心の休養のため」と言って休みを書き込んでいました。

ここ数週間、出発日が近づくにつれ上司の行動や話し方からだけではなく、
周囲の人の彼女へ対する思いやりや気の使い方、言う冗談などから
どれだけ彼女にとって大変な日なのかがしみじみと伝わってきました。
実際の出発日には息子さんを家族と共にバス・ターミナルまで送りに行っていることは
わかっていたのですが、職場でもみんな気になるようで、なんとなくそわそわしていました。
仕事仲間が当日の夜上司に電話をかけたそうなのですが、
8時半の時点でもう床に入ってしまってたとのこと。

職場に戻って来た時の彼女の様子も、そしていつ実際戻って来るかということも
予想がつかなかったのですが、出発日のわずか二日後に彼女は出勤しました。
ほとんどいつもと変わりない様子で、出発日当日のことも話してくれました。
見送った後息子さんの部屋を片付けに行った時が一番こたえたそうです、、、

でもこれだけ騒いどいて、、、実は息子さん、出発後のわずか4日後、
またキブツに戻ってきているんだそうです!
数週間ごとに週末は帰ってくるそうですが、
みんなの騒ぎ様からはしばらく帰ってこないのかと思ってた、、、

でもだからこそ、これからは兵士を違う目でみるようになると思うんです。
イスラエル人の母親のほとんどが子供をアーミーに送らなければならないからといって、
一人一人の辛さは決して軽くなるわけじゃないし、
また、再会ができるたびに別れが楽になるわけではないのかもしれない。
そんなことを考えされました。

一人娘さんが2年後にアーミーに行く仕事仲間は今から既に犬を飼う予定だそうです。

皆様は元気でしたか?

Much love,
Kaori