Skip to content

26 June 2012 (The Shared Taxi)

June 26, 2012

When I get on the sherut (shared taxi) going to Tiberias,
the driver is engaged in conversation with an elderly passenger in the front seat.
They are talking about Putin’s current visit to Israel.

At a stop near the local college a few students hop on, one of whose music
leaking from her headphones easily fills up at least the front half of the taxi.

Soon the money starts to travel from one passenger’s hand to another.
This never fails to surprise me each time I ride a sherut.
There doesn’t seem to be an official rule about when one should pay their fare.
But there does seem to be an understanding that whenever a passenger decides to pay,
in a vehicle that fits up to 10 passengers, those sitting towards the back
are not going to stand and hand the fare to the driver themselves.
They are going to hand the fare to someone sitting in front of them
who is then going to tap the shoulder of the person in front of them
and eventually it reaches the driver. The same thing happens in reverse with the change.
Everyone doing this like it’s completely normal.

At the central bus station in Tiberias, the man I buy a small snack from
asks me in English if I’m a tourist. No, I live here, I reply in Hebrew.
He then proceeds to tell me that I am beautiful and
invites me to sit down with him for coffee.
I guess it is too late to pretend like I don’t understand him.

I politely decline and walk out of his store towards yet
another sherut I will be riding for the day.
It is still parked with its engine off, the driver sitting on a fold out chair
eating ice cream while trying to recruit potential passengers.
His Hebrew sounds like Arabic to me, before I realize that he is actually
switching between Hebrew and Arabic depending on who he is talking to.

Already seated and waiting patiently in the sherut is a family of three
speaking in rapid French but in an accent I don’t recognize.
They too seem to be switching back and forth between French and Hebrew,
making it even harder for me to guess where they are from.

Suddenly I realize I am invigorated by all these small interactions and observations.
I am inspired and intrigued, feeling like I do when I travel,
trying to mentally record everything I am hearing and witnessing.
Hoping to not forget, to be able to retell their stories some day.

And this is even before the sherut takes off for Tel Aviv,
where Yuval is all week for business.

It made me realize that I really should get out of my kibbutz fairy land more often.

ティベリア行きのシェールート(バスとタクシーの中間のようなもの)に乗ると、
運転手が一番前の席に座っている年配の男性客と話に熱中している。
現在イスラエルを訪問中のプーチン大統領についてあれこれ言っている。

近くの大学前のバス停からは学生が数人乗って来た。
その中の一人のヘッドホンからはシェールートの半分ぐらいには余裕で聞こえるくらい
音楽が漏れている。

人々がそれぞれの席におさまったと思うと、お金が乗客の間で動き始める。
これは毎回シェールートに乗るたび未だにちょっとびっくりすること。
いつお金を払うべきかのルールはないようだが、
お金の払い方には暗黙の了解みたいのものがある。
最高10人まで乗れるこのシェールートの中で後ろの席に座っている人は
自分で席を立って運転手にお金を渡すのではなく、
自分の前の席に座っている人に渡し、またその前の人へと、
徐々にお金は運転手へ到着する。おつりも同じ。
皆これがまったく当たり前のような顔をしながらする。

ティベリアの中央バス停でお菓子を買ったお店のおじさんに観光客かと英語で聞かれる。
いいえ、ここに住んでいるよ、とヘブライ語で答えると、
美人だね、コーヒー一杯どう?と彼は聞いてきた。
しまった、もうヘブライ語がわからないふりをするにはおそい。

丁寧に断りまた新たに乗るシェールートへ向かう。
まだエンジンが切ったままで窓が全開。
運転手は折りたたみ式の椅子に座り、アイスクリームを食べながら
通りすがり全ての人に行き先を問う。
彼のヘブライ語はアラビア語に聞こえると思っていたのだがしばらくして
彼はしゃべる相手によってヘブライ語からアラビア語にスイッチしていることに気付く。

停車中のシェールートの中には既に席に座り
発車を待っている三人家族がいる。
彼らはフランス語でしゃべっているが聞いたことのないアクセントだ。
しかも彼らもフランス語とヘブライ語をいったりきたりしているようなので余計わかりにくい。

突然、今までのちょっとしたやりとりや観察してきたことに
自分がとても元気づけられていることに気付く。
海外へ旅行をする時のようにインスピレーションを受け、みるもの全てに興味津々で、
耳にすること、目撃すること全てを頭の中に残そうとしている自分がいる。
忘れないように、今日目の前に繰り広げられた物語をいつか言い伝えられるように。

しかもこれはまだテルアビブ行きのシェールートが出発する前。
今週一週間ユバルが仕事でテルアビブにいるので、私も一日だけ遊びに行くことにしたのだ。

普段のキブツの世界からもっと出るべき、と実感させられた。

Much love,
Kaori

4 Comments leave one →
  1. June 29, 2012 7:57 pm

    This was fun to read. Taking public transportation to Jerusalem always feels like another more diverse, more intense universe compared to Tel Aviv and its suburbs (driving in a car doesn’t provide the same experience). I just read another mention of how unusual the sherut money thing is here and thought you might enjoy the list: http://blogs.timesofisrael.com/the-little-things-ill-miss-about-israel/

    • July 1, 2012 7:41 am

      Yes, public transportation in Israel is such an intense experience than doing the same drive in a car, isn’t it?

      Thanks for that list, it was an interesting read🙂

  2. Abby permalink
    July 1, 2012 12:13 am

    Amazing how you’re getting around using Hebrew. I wish I could hear you speak. Much love. Abby

    • July 1, 2012 7:43 am

      Oh, my Hebrew is still very bad. Definitely not even close to how your Japanese was at two years in Japan, I am sure! Most times I still struggle, but sometimes I get through a small interaction without any problems. It’s still a hit or miss for me like that.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: