Skip to content

4 May 2012 (Tagid li and Takshiv li)

May 4, 2012

Tagid li and Takshiv li are used quite often in conversations here in Israel.

I will even go so far as to say that on a typical day, about 80% of sentences spoken by my co-workers start with one of them.

Tagid li (תגיד לי) means “Tell me”. (Tagidi li when spoken to a female.)

Takshiv li (תקשיב לי) means “Listen to me”. (Takshivi li when spoken to a female.)

Both Tagid li and Takshiv li are conversation starters. In my observations, Tagid li is almost always added in front of a question. “Tagid li, when does the pool open?” for example.

Takshiv li is often reduced to just Takshiv (Listen) or emphasized stronger by the addition of tov (Listen carefully).

Now, if you’ve been reading this blog for a while (thanks!), you already know that Israelis very easily get into heated discussions. It’s actually not “heated” in most of their standards, it’s just the way they have conversation. Never mind that their voice levels very quickly reach my standard of shouting, but that’s just a norm for most of them too.

These discussions often sound like a ping pong match of Takshiv to me. A person will start, “Takshiv (listen)…” and sometimes the other person actually will. Then they will reply back with their own “Takshiv…”

But more often the case, the ping pong match rapidly turns fast and furious. Even before the first person finishes saying their “Takshiv” the other person has already hit back with their “Takshiv.” Translated in to English, the conversation will sound something like this:
“Listen!”
“No, you listen!”
“No, you listen!!”

When the discussion and voice levels really get heated up, it’s time for “Takshiv tov.” Sometimes the other person will oblige, but often times it’s just the same as the prior case.
“Listen carefully!”
“No, you listen carefully!”
“No, you listen carefully!!”

In a country where many people do not seem to listen, it’s interesting that some of the most common used phrases are “Tell me” and “Listen to me”. These phrases also transfer over to when people talk to me in English. I wonder what the equivalent is in Japan… perhaps our beloved “Sumimasen (excuse me)”?

I hope you have a great weekend of telling and listening my friends,

ここイスラエルの会話で良く聞かれる言葉に
タギッドゥ リ」と
タクシヴ リ」があります。

私が仕事場で聞く会話の約8割はこの二つのうちのどちらかで始まります。

タギッドゥ リ (תגיד לי)」 は「私に教えて」とか「私に聞かせて」という意味。
(女性に対しては「タギッド 」)

タクシヴ リ (תקשיב לי)」 は「私の言うことを聞いて」という意味。
(女性に大しては「タクシヴ 」)

このフレーズは両方とも会話を始める時に使われます。
私の観察からは、質問はほとんどと言っていいほど「タギッドゥ リ」で始まります。
例えば「タギッドゥ リ、プールはいつからあいているのかな?」

タクシヴ リ」は大抵「タクシヴ(聞いて)」に省略されるか、
逆にもっと強調したい時はトーヴが付け加えられます(良く聞いて)。

さて、このブログをもうしばらく読んでくださっている方は(ありがとう!!)
既にイスラエル人が良く討論になることはご存知でしょう。
と言ってもイスラエル人が「討論」と感じていることは少なく、
普通の会話をしているつもりらしいですが。
声の音量も私の感覚では怒鳴り声と感じるレベルも多くのイスラエル人にとっては普通。

このような討論は「タクシヴ」の卓球マッチのように聞こえることがたびたび。
一人が「「タクシヴ(ねえ聞いて)、、、」と始まり、
相手が実際素直に聞く場合もある。
そして聞き終わった後、答えを新たな「タクシヴ、、、」で切り出す。

でも大抵、卓球マッチはあっと言う間にスピードが早まります。
一人目が「タクシヴ」を言い終わる前に相手の「タクシヴ」に割り込まれる。
翻訳するとこんな感じでしょうか。
「聞いて!」
「いいえ、あなたが聞いて!」
「いいえ、あなたが聞くのよ!」

討論の内容と声のレベルがエスカレートすると「タクシヴ トーヴ」の出番です。
たまに相手がその通りにする場合がありますが、大抵は前の例と同じ。
「良く聞いて!」
「いいえ、あなたが良く聞いて!」
「いいえ、あなたが良く聞きなさいよ!」

観察しているとあまりお互いの言うことを聞いていないようなこの国で、
最も良く使われるフレーズの中に「聞かせて」と「聞いて」があるのは興味深いものです。
この全国的な口癖は人々が私に英語でしゃべる時もそのまま翻訳されて使われます。
日本語で同じような全国的な口癖といったら何になるのでしょう、、、、
やっぱ「すみませ〜ん」ですかね? 笑

良く聞かせて聞く、素晴らしい週末を!

Much love,
Kaori

No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: