Skip to content

164 (Yotam Ottolenghi)

December 21, 2011

Photo from BBC Radio 4's Woman's Hour website

I recently heard London-based Israeli chef Yotam Ottolenghi on BBC Radio 4’s Woman’s Hour.
He was promoting a BBC4 documentary about his culinary trip back to his hometown Jerusalem, “Jerusalem on a Plate” (only available online to UK audiences), and also introduced his version of Baba Ganoush. Here are some excerpts on what he had to say about Jerusalem:

The funny thing about Jerusalem is that
it’s a real sort of mixture, a melting pot of cultures,
and you’ve got the big divide between the Jews and the Arabs,
the Palestinians and the Israelis.
And there’s not a lot going on in terms of daily interaction.
But food is the one place I notice where people do actually interact,
which is quite amazing.
I mean, they will que on the same vegetable store, the same falafel store.
And they will cook together in restaurants.
So basically, it’s the one and only point that is a little bit more optimistic,
or makes you a little bit more cheerful about the prospects.

When presenter Jane Garvey asked him if he feels, because of food, there might be some grounds for optimism, he replied,

“I have to be a little bit more realistic about that.
It’s nice to see that there is a space where things could happen,
but unfortunately it doesn’t happen enough.”

He also described a scene in the documentary where he asked a Palestinian man who’s been making hummus the same way for many generations how he feels about the political take on the dish because Israelis say they appropriated the dish, the man replied,
“They took our land, they took our culture, you think I care about a plate of hummus?”
When the presenter described the moment as a “tricky” one, Yotam Ottolenghi agreed but said it’s Jerusalem after all and that’s what you expect from the city.

I know Yotam Ottolenghi was talking about Jerusalem but he pretty much summed up my impression of Israel so far: while there is a divide between the Jews and the Arabs, interactions do happen, sometimes in unexpected places, but in terms of optimism you have to be realistic. There are positive things happening, but never enough. And all this complicated tricky stuff is what you’re supposed to expect from such a country.

先日、ロンドンに拠点を置くイスラエル人シェフ、Yotam Ottolenghiさんのインタビューを
BBC Radio 4の番組「Woman’s Hourで聴きました。
彼の出身地であるエルサレムでの食を巡る旅の模様をおさめたBBC4ドキュメンタリー
Jerusalem on a Plate」の宣伝と、
ババガヌーシュという茄子のディップの作り方を紹介する、という内容。
彼はエルサレムについてこのように話していました:

エルサレムの面白いところは本当に色々な文化がミックスしている人種のるつぼでありながら、
ユダヤ人とアラブ人、つまりイスラエル人とパレスチナ人の間に大きな溝がある。
双方の間に日常的な交流はあまりない。
でも食べ物の世界は、唯一私が人々が交流するのをみたところで、本当に素晴らしいんです。
同じ野菜屋さんやフェラフェル屋さんにユダヤ人、アラブ人が一緒に列に並ぶ。
また、同じレストランで一緒に料理をする。
なので、唯一少し希望を持てる場なのだと思います。

司会者のジェーン・ガーヴィーさんが、では食を通じて前向きな将来が可能だと思いますか、
と尋ねると、彼は、

それに関しては私はもうちょっと現実的です。
交流が起こる場面がみられるのは素晴らしいですが、
実際このような場面はとても少ないのです。
」と答えました。

また彼はドキュメンタリーの中のワンシーンを振り返りました。
何世代にも渡って同じ方法でフムスを作り続けてきたパレスチナ人男性に対して彼は
この料理の政治的な意見はどう思うかと尋ねました。
なぜならば、イスラエル人はフムスを最初に作ったのは自分たちだ、と信じているからです。
そうするとパレスチナ人男性は、
「イスラエル人は私たちの土地を奪い、文化を奪った。
フムスのことなんて気にしていると思うかい?」と返しました。
司会者がこのシーンはちょっと気まずかったですね、と言うと彼は、
エルサレムのことだからこのような出来事は当たり前です、と笑っていました。

Yotam Ottolenghiさんはエルサレムについて話していたかもしれないけれども、
彼が言っていたことは私のイスラエル全体の印象と重なり合う。
ユダヤ人とアラブ人の間に確かに深い溝はあるけれど、交流は起きている。
意外なところ、気付かないようなところ、などでも。
しかし平和とか前向きな方向に関しては大体の人が現実的。
ポジティブなことは色んなところで起きているかもしれないけど、まだまだ足りない。
そしてこのような複雑でわかりにくいことは、イスラエルという国では当たり前なこと。

Much love,
Kaori

No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: