Skip to content

155

November 19, 2011


. . .
“When you’re a late-comer to a language, what happens is
you live there with a continuous and perpetual frustration.
As late-comers, we always want to say more, you know,
crack better jokes, say better things.
But we end up saying less because
there’s a gap between the mind and the tongue.
And that gap is very intimidating.
But if we manage not to be frightened by it, it’s also stimulating.”

Yes indeed, Ms. Shafak. I couldn’t have said it better myself about the “continuous and perpetual frustration.” Although I must admit, I haven’t reached the point of wanting to say more or crack better jokes in Hebrew, I’m far from it. I’m still working on just saying anything at all.

I’m still mute most of the time at work, only occasionally being able to grasp a few words here and there in the rapid chatter that surrounds me. Nowadays I can usually pick up the rough content of a conversation, especially if it’s just listening in, but when a question is thrown at me quickly, unexpectedly, I often draw a complete blank and am discouraged all over again. The day when I’ll be able to make people laugh or show my sarcastic side or make a wise-ass remark to a rude person, you know, the kind of things that sometimes require extra care and wit even in one’s mother tongue, feels extremely far away if not unattainable.

I came across this TED talk by Turkish writer Elif Shafak after being intrigued by an amazing story she told at The Moth featured on their podcast this week.

The above quote is from when she was talking about how English is an acquired language for her, and she continued on to say that on one hand she loves writing in Turkish because it’s “very poetic and emotional” for her, while she also loves writing in English, which to her is “very mathematical and cerebral”.

This comment seems to have raised quite a controversy (I don’t know the details as I didn’t read all the 1,000+ comments), but I can relate in the aspect that when you acquire new languages, each language seems to bring out a different you. Your tone of voice may change. Your body language may take a different form. Your personality may even be presented a little differently. While Ms. Shafak’s English is excellent, I am still intrigued to hear her speak in her native Turkish, just to see what kind of a transition there is.

Another memorable quote comes from when she talked about stereotypes we create of those that differ from ourselves. While this is often not coming from lack of knowledge today, we actually know a lot about each other, or so we think — she says “knowledge that takes us not beyond ourselves, it makes us elitist, distant, and disconnected“.

Here in Israel, a nation full of immigrants, I am often taken back by the abundance of stereotypes that exist. I am totally guilty in this too, I can’t help having stereotypes myself but I always try to remind myself to think of them as references and would never say it to someone’s face. But I hear people openly expressing them all the time here in Israel.

The Jews towards the Arabs. The Arabs towards the Jews. Within Jews, the Ashkenazis towards the Sepharadis and vice versa. The Orthdox versus the secular. Within the Arabs, there are the Bedouins, the Druze, the Christians. And then the stereotypes beyond religion against Russians, Ukranians, Romanians, Polish, Ethiopians, Moroccans, the Kurdish, Argentinians, etc, etc.

And finally, of course, stereotypes towards Asians like myself. I’ll never forget the time I was swimming in the kibbutz pool shortly after I arrived in Israel. A woman came up to me and asked, “Who do you work for?” She assumed I was among the many Thai and Philippine workers who provide live-in care for the elderly. Or the countless people who simply ask me, “Chinese?” or “Philippine?” Why can’t they just ask, “Where are you from?”

You can see this TED talk inspired many thoughts in me, my friends. If you have the time I highly recommend watching it. The full manuscript is also available in many languages, for those of you that prefer the written form over video.

Shabbat Shalom friends,

. . .

「ある程度の年齢になってから新しい言語を学ぼうとすると
常にもどかしさを感じることになります。
人を笑わせたり気のきいたコメントをしたくても
言葉が出てこないのは心と言語能力に差があるからです。
その差があることで気後れしますが
おじけづかないことを身につけるとその感覚も刺激的です。」

ごもっともです、シャファークさん。
特に「常にもどかしさを感じることになる」部分。
でも私がヘブライ語で人を笑わせたり気のきいたコメントをしたいと思うレベルには
まだまだ達してないのですがね。
ただ単に言葉を発することが目標なレベルです、はい。

職場ではいまだにほとんど無言、
毎日私を包む猛スピードの言葉たちの中でたまに一言二言ピックアップできればいいほう。
最近では会話の内容は大体わかるのですが、それは他の人の会話を聞いている場合だけ。
突然私に対して質問が投げかけられると、ほとんどの場合全くわからず、
自分の能力のなさに絶望してしまうのです。
面白いジョークを言ったり、皮肉的なコメントをしたり、
失礼な人に対してぴしゃっと強い言葉を返すなど、母国語でさえちょっとした工夫が必要な
言葉の使い方が可能になる日は限りなく遠く感じます。

今週のThe Mothのポッドキャストでトルコ人作家エリーフ・シャファークさんの
素晴らしいトークを聞いてから彼女のことをもっと知りたくなり、
ネットで検索しているうちに
彼女のこのTEDのスピーチにたどりついたのでした。

上の言葉は彼女が英語は勉強して身につけたことを話していた時から。
続いて彼女は文章を書く時、トルコ語で書くのが大好きな理由は
彼女にとって「ロマンチックで感情に訴える言語」だから、
また英語で書くのが大好きな理由は
彼女にとって「数理的で知性に訴える言語」だからと言いました。

このコメントは波紋を呼んだようですが
(1000以上のコメントを全て読んでいないので詳細はわかりませんが)
新しい言語を習うたびに、新しい自分が発見できる、という意味で私は共感できます。
違う言語をしゃべると声のトーンが変わるかもしれない。
もしくはボディーランゲージに変化があるかもしれない。
性格さえちょっと異なってくるかもしれない。
シャリーフさんの英語は素晴らしいですが、
それでも彼女がトルコ語でしゃべるのも聞いてみたいと思うのです。
どんな変化が起こるのかをみたいばかりに。

もう一つ印象に残った言葉は、彼女が文化的ステレオタイプについて話していた時。
私たちは自分たちと異なる人達に対してステレオタイプを持つけれど、
それは知識がないからではなく、逆にお互いに関する知識は十分に持っている。
でも「私たち自身を超えられない知識はエリート主義者をつくりだし切り離されていきます」、と。

ここイスラエルは移民の国ですが、ステレオタイプの多さには常にびっくりします。
私自身もステレオタイプをもちろん持っていますが、
いつもあくまでも参考までと思うようにしているし、
ましてや口に出して言おうとは思いません。
でもイスラエル人は平気で口にするのです。

それがユダヤ人がアラブ系の人へ対するものであったり、
アラブ系の人がユダヤ人に対するものであったり。
ユダヤ人の間でもアシュケナジー 対 スファラディー、
宗教的 対 非宗教的 など。
アラブ系の間でもベドゥイン、ドルーズ、クリスチャンなど。
宗教に無関係なステレオタイプは
ロシア人、ウクライナ人、ルーマニア人、ポーランド人、
エチオピア人、モロッコ人、クルド人、アルゼンチン人、などなど、、、。

そしてもちろん、私のようなアジア系の人に対するステレオタイプも存在します。
今でも忘れられないのは、私がイスラエルに来て間もない時、キブツのプールで泳いでいた時のこと。
ある年配の女性が私に質問してきたのは、「あなたは誰のヘルパー?」
ご年配の方のつきっきり介護ヘルパーはタイ人やフィリピン人が多いのですが、
彼女は私も当然そのうちの一人と思い込んでいたのです。
また、人々に「中国人?」「フィリピン人?」と聞かれるのはしょっちゅうのこと。
「どこ出身?」と聞いてくれたらいいのにな。

みるからにこのシャファークさんのトークに色々考えさせられました。
時間がある人にはかなりお勧めです。日本語の字幕もあります。
ビデオより文章、という人には日本語に訳された本文もビデオの右側にあります。

では良い週末を!シャバート・シャローム、

Much love,
Kaori

5 Comments leave one →
  1. Sammi permalink
    November 22, 2011 1:40 am

    My dear Kaori! You are so impressive to me. You are learning a difficult language, translated into English, then to Japanese, and in reverse as well. This takes a lot of brain power! I admire you very much!
    We were remembering your visit with us for Thanksgiving so many years ago. I am so glad we are able to keep in touch! Have a happy Thanksgiving over there in Isreal, where you do not celebrate this holiday any more than you would in Japan!😉 We will still think of you and wish you the best of everything!
    Much love,
    Sammi

    • November 24, 2011 6:27 pm

      Thank you Sammi! It’s strange because to some people Hebrew is apparently a very easy language to learn. I wish I had their brain!🙂

      The Thanksgiving I spent with your family remains a very warm memory in my heart. A very Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family!

      Much love,
      Kaori

  2. tokyobling permalink
    November 30, 2011 10:56 am

    Sorry to hear about the woman at the pool… that happens to almost all of my Japanese friends who go abroad. Very sad. If you want to think of it positively it is possible that she like your looks and wanted to hire you! (^-^)

    Great blog, as I said before, write more! (^-^)/

    • November 30, 2011 12:08 pm

      It’s always good to try and think things the positive way, isn’t it?🙂 I’m trying, I’m trying…🙂

Trackbacks

  1. 160 (Preconceived notions | 先入観) « Meuleh! מעולה | Meuleh | メウレ

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: