Skip to content

154

November 14, 2011

I learned at work today that the 15-year old daughter of one of my co-workers I wrote about previously will be going to her very first army training for three days next week.

“Training? You mean her first interview to determine what unit she will be placed in?” I asked, remembering how Yuval’s 17-year old nephew just had his first interview a few weeks ago.

“No, no, that happens about a year before you start the army. My daughter is just turning 16 next month! She’s been specially recruited because she’s very good at Arabic. She’s among the top 5 students of Arabic in her class that are going.”

“How did the army find her??” I couldn’t help asking.

“I don’t know, but you can’t hide from them, they know everything!” replied my co-worker, half-joking, but we both knew the truth behind this. My co-worker went on to tell me she is already getting nervous about it.

“We’ve never been separated all these years, my daughter and I. It’s so hard!”

I don’t know the story behind it but my co-worker is a single mother. The strength of the bond between her and her daughter is very obvious. I can’t imagine what she must be going through, but it reminded me of one of my childhood friends’ mom when her oldest son went away to boarding school. Among the mothers she was the funniest and would make us laugh with silly faces when taking our picture. But when I went to visit my friend shortly after her brother left, the mom came to say hi but suddenly burst in to tears in front of us. “I’m sorry,” she kept on saying, but couldn’t stop crying. That memory haunted me for days afterwards, for I had never seen my friend’s mother so devastated, and perhaps it was also the first time I had witnessed such a parent’s yearning for their child.

My co-worker told me how she was a combat soldier placed in Lebanon when she was in the army. I could tell she was proud of her accomplishment and therefore must be proud of her daughter for having so much potential being recruited at such a young age, but that doesn’t make things any easier. Ah, to be a parent in Israel. Will there ever be a day when parents don’t have to worry about the inevitable day their children go off to the army?

今日仕事で、以前ここでも書いたことのある同僚の15歳の娘が初のアーミーの研修へ
来週3日間行くことを知りました。

「研修?それって初めての面接のこと?
どのユニットに行くかを決めるための?」と私は聞きました。
と言うのは、つい先日ユバルの17歳の甥がその初の面接に行ってきたばかりだったのです。

「違う違う、それはアーミーを始める約1年前にする面接のことでしょ。
私の娘は来月やっと16歳になるのよ!
彼女はアラビア語が良くできるから特別にリクルートされたの。
彼女の学年から、アラビア語の成績の上位5位の生徒がね。」

「そもそもアーミーはどうやって彼女をみつけたの?」
私は聞かずにはいられませんでした。

「わからない。でもアーミーからは逃げられない、彼らはなんでも知ってるの!」
と彼女は半分冗談で言いましたが、半分マジだということは暗黙の了解、、、
彼女は娘の研修のことがもう今から心配なのです。

「ずっと今まで離ればなれになったことがないの、私たち。本当に辛いわ!」

詳細は知らないのですが、彼女と彼女の娘は母子家庭。
二人の絆の強さはとても明らかなのです。
私は彼女の心境は想像することしかできませんが、
このことからある幼なじみのお母さんのことを思い出しました。
幼なじみのお兄さんが全寮制の高校へ入学した時のことです。
このお母さんは幼なじみのお母さんの中でも一番にぎやかで子供を笑わせるのが上手でした。
ある誕生日パーティーで集合写真を撮る時、彼女が変な顔をしては
みんなでげらげら笑っているところ撮られたのを覚えています。

幼なじみのお兄さんが学校に入学して間もない時に彼女に会いに行った時のこと。
お母さんもいつものように顔を出してくれたのですが、話している途中
突然泣きだしてしまったのです。
「ごめんね、今度会う時にはもう泣かないからね、」と言いながらも
彼女は泣き止むことができませんでした。

それからしばらくこの思い出にとりつかれたのを覚えています。
友達のお母さんがあんなに悲しそうで寂しそうな姿をみたのは初めてだったし、
また、このように子供に対する親の愛の強さを目撃するのも初めてだったのかもしれません。

私の同僚は彼女がアーミーにいた時の話もしてくれました。
戦闘兵士としてレバノンにいたこと、
大きな銃と荷物を持ち歩いたことなど。
彼女がアーミーでの経験をとても誇りに思っているのは明らかだったので、
娘がこんなに若い年からリクルートされるほどアーミーでの将来性があることも
とても誇り高いことなのだと思います。
でもだからと言って辛さは和らがない。
イスラエルで親になることは子供がいずれアーミーに行くという避けられない現実があります。
この現実がなくなる日はいつか来るのでしょうか。

Much love,
Kaori

2 Comments leave one →
  1. tokyobling permalink
    November 17, 2011 2:38 am

    That’s a fascinating story. I remember my own (not very dramatic) army service, and also of meeting veterans from the war in Lebanon, veterans of different sides who had more things in common than hatred of each other.

    • November 17, 2011 6:26 pm

      I have never served for any army myself, but I can totally believe veterans of different sides having more things in common than hatred for one another. Just from living in Israel, I can believe that is possible.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: