Skip to content

134

August 5, 2011

From the 365 Day Hebrew Art Project:

שוקולד

Pronunciation: Shocolad
Definition: Chocolate

発音:ショコラードゥ
意味:チョコレート

.
.
…Continued from previous post: 133

After the interview, I went through a typical process after any job interview.

For the first day or two, I didn’t give it much thought, other than how nice it would be if I got the job.

From around the third day onwards, the reality started to sink in that I may have not gotten the job, and that they may not even call me to let me know. I played the interview over and over in my head, wondering what I could have said differently.

Also while trying to figure out what went wrong, I reached all sorts of regretful realizations. Perhaps there was a part of me that assumed if I was my natural self they would accept me. Perhaps I had thought deep down, how hard can the job be? And that exact attitude may have cost me the job.

But after nearly two weeks, they called me back to see if I would like to come in for a few trial days. So off I went, and again, looking back, maybe I unconsciously assumed that I could do no wrong. I had done far more complicated jobs before.

I was prepared to just observe in the beginning, but was surprised that they made me to start making chocolate right away. The least complicated kinds obviously, but within minutes of walking in there, I was making chocolate.

Nearly a month and a half later, the small details have faded away (thank goodness). The only thing I remember about the first day is that it zipped by in a blur, and at the end of the day I checked in to the manager’s office. After a quick exchange of how are you’s, she told me that she knew it was just my first day, but from tomorrow I really need to start doing things much faster. And at that instant, any romantic feelings of working with chocolate I had left in me crumbled away.

What I remember from the second day is one of the women screaming at me while cleaning up at the end. How startled I was at her harshness, and frustrated I was at not being able to understand what was probably very simple instructions. How I cried the whole bike ride home, despite how silly it felt for crying over such a thing.

What I remember from the third day is at lunch (when we all sat down at a table in the storage room every day) one of the women spoke about making sushi and another claimed she hates sushi because she hates fish, and the whole time, there was not even a nod my way. Perhaps they thought I didn’t understand (although it’s hard to not understand the word “sushi”), or perhaps they didn’t know I was from Japan. But it added to the general feeling I had over those few days that these people had no interest in me whatsoever. In the three days, there was not a single question geared towards me including “how are you”. I’ve been in plenty of jobs before where people were too busy to give me instructions or proper training let alone make small conversation. But this place didn’t come close to the stress level of those past jobs.

The whole experience ended with the manager calling me in to her office at the end of the third day and telling me that it wasn’t going to work out. Their reasoning being, it’s a very busy time and they don’t have the energy to train someone from scratch. Not because of my language skills, or because I worked too slow, which I suspected was their true reasoning, and what would have made me feel much better if they were just honest about it.
.
.
So, with this experience behind me, perhaps I took the laundry job with a less underlying attitude of I’m too good for this or how hard can it be. It allowed me to be even more appreciative when the people didn’t ever complain about my speed, but only encouraged me constantly, even when I made a mistake. Or when I don’t understand something, instead of screaming at me my manager tries to find other ways to make me understand (including calling her husband on the phone to ask how to say something in English). Or how on the first day they asked me something about Japan (do we eat jellyfish?).

But I couldn’t help but overlap myself at the chocolate factory in the South African Man at the laundry. How maybe, once people decided they didn’t want someone, it was just easier to collectively see that person’s faults, rather than giving them the benefit of the doubt.

I’m glad I’m able to see both sides of the coin.

…前のエントリー 133の続き

面接の後は、典型的なプロセスを通りました。

最初の1〜2日間は、それほど考えない。仕事が決まるといいな、以外は。

3日目あたりから、もしかしたら決まらなかったという現実が浸透し始める。
「他の人に決まりました」の電話すら来ないかもしれないことも。
面接を何度も頭の中でリプレーし、ああすればよかった、こうすればよかったと考える。

また、そう考えるうちになおさら後悔したくなるようなことに気付く。
無意識に、自然のままの自分でいれば仕事が決まるに間違いない
のような思い込みで面接に望んだかもしれないこと。
心の底で、どうせ簡単な仕事だし、のように思っていたかもしれないこと。
そしてこのような態度そのものが、ダメになった原因だったかもしれないこと。

でも約2週間後、まずトライアルとして数日間来てくださいという連絡がありました。
喜んで臨みましたが、今思い返してみると無意識に「トライアルが上手くいかないはずがない」
と当然のように思っていたのかもしれません。
今までにはるかにより複雑な仕事をこなしてきたのだから。

最初は見学から始まるのかな、と思っていたらすぐにチョコレートを
つくらされたことにはびっくりしました。
本当に、職場にはいって数分もしないうちにチョコレートを必死につくっていました。

約1ヶ月半たった今、細かいことは忘れてしまいましたが(幸いなことに)
1日目の記憶に残っていることは、時間があっと言う間に過ぎたこと、
そして仕事を終えてからマネージャーのオフィスに挨拶に行ったら
初日の感想をさらっと聞かれた後、「今日は初日だったから仕方ないけど、
明日からはもっと早く作業できるよう努力してね。」と言われたこと。
その瞬間、既にほとんど残っていなかったチョコレートを作ることに対するロマンみたいなものが
ガタガタと音をたててくずれていったこと。

2日目の記憶に残っていることは、最後の掃除の時に一緒に作業をしていたスタッフに
すごい勢いで怒鳴られたこと。
彼女のあまりのきつさに一瞬動作が止まってしまったこと、
そして恐らくとても簡単であろう彼女の指示が理解できない自分に対する
自己嫌悪がピークに達したこと。
家までの帰り道を、自転車をこぎながらずっと泣き続けたこと。
こんなことで泣いている自分が情けなかったこと。

3日目の記憶に残っていることは、昼食の最中
(毎日みんなで倉庫のテーブルを囲み食事をとりました)
あるスタッフが自宅でスシをつくった話をし、
それに対してほかのスタッフが魚が大嫌いだから絶対スシは食べない、
という内容の会話中、一度も私のことを認識すらしなかったこと。
もしかしたら私が会話を理解していなかったと思ったかもしれないし
(でも「スシ」は誰だって理解できる言葉だと思うけど、、、)
もしくは私が日本出身だということを知らなかったのかもしれません。
でもこの出来事は働いた数日間の間でひしひしと感じていた、
「この人達は私に全く興味がないんだ」という気持ちを裏付けるようなことでした。
3日間の間に、仕事の指示以外は私に話しかけることは「元気?」のような社交辞令さえ
一切なかったのです。
今までに、ちゃんとした引き継ぎや研修などをしてくれる余裕がない職場は何度も経験してきました。
でもそれらの職場のストレスレベルには、比べ物にならなかったのです。

そして全ては3日目の終わりにマネージャーのオフィスに呼び出され、
「残念だけど今回はお断りするわ」と言われて終ったのでした。
理由は、今はとても忙しい時期で誰かを一から教えるひまも余裕もない、とのこと。
現実は恐らく私の語学力と作業のスピードだったと思うし、
そう素直に言ってくれればもっとすっきりしたのに、と思わされたのでした。
.
.
この経験があったからこそ、クリーニングの仕事が転がり込んできた時、
無意識に「どうせ簡単な仕事だし」とか「なんで私がこんな仕事を」
のような態度を避けられたのかもしれません。
そしてクリーニングのスタッフの人達が私の作業のスピードに対して
一切文句を言わず、何かを間違っても親切に直してくれることを
より感謝できたのかもしれません。
クリーニングのマネージャーは、私が言葉を理解できないと、
どうか理解させようと色々違う言い方をしたり、旦那さんに電話をして
英語の言い方を聞いてくれたりします。
そして私の初日早々、日本のことを聞いてきました(「日本人はクラゲは食べるの?」)。

でも、いずれクビになってしまった南アフリカ人男性に、
チョコレート工場での自分が重なったのは事実です。
もしかしたら、ある人を一端拒否し始めたら、職場全員の目にその人の欠点しか目立たなくなり、
その人の努力や良い点はみえなくなってしまうのかもしれないこと。

両方の視点がみえるような経験があってよかったと思いました。

Much love,
Kaori

6 Comments leave one →
  1. August 7, 2011 12:27 am

    そうですね。その怒鳴ったくだらない奴に振り回されるより、その経験から自分が何を得ることができたかを考えたほうが建設的ですね。
    いや、それにしても立派ですよ。
    普通なら誰でも辞めちゃうところでしょうね。
    私も初心を忘れないように毎日コツコツとやっていこうと思います。

    • August 7, 2011 5:11 pm

      ありがとうございます☆
      私は嫌な経験ほど、後で自分のためになっている気がします。
      そう思えるまでには大抵時間がかかりますがね 汗

  2. August 7, 2011 8:35 am

    Good for you for surviving three days of in such conditions! I don’t think you’re giving yourself enough credit for sticking it out. One of the hardest things for me at work in Israel is getting used to the yelling when people do things too slowly or make a mistake or disagree with each other. It’s tough not to let it affect me, even though people know not to yell at me, and even when the people yelling and being yelled at take it completely in stride and can smile immediately afterward. I’m glad people at your job go out of their way to encourage and communicate with you. It must be a big relief after the chocolate experience.

    • August 7, 2011 5:21 pm

      Thanks Katie! I certainly feel your pain, I hate being in the presence of people yelling at each other, especially if it’s confrontational. Reading your comment has actually made me realize that maybe I wasn’t so “special” in the chocolate factory and that other people do get yelled at there too, I just wasn’t there long enough to witness it. Either way, I’m so glad I’m not working there.

      People at the laundry yell at each other sometimes too, but most of the time they’re just joking around with one another or yelling about someone else (instead of at each other). Israelis tend to raise their voices quite easily anyway, don’t they? Even if it turns out they’re just very enthusiastically talking about the weather.

  3. August 12, 2011 1:16 am

    I hadn’t visited in a while and started reading your ‘chocolate interview’ post which ended with ‘to be continued…’. I felt a real moment of panic thinking I might not be able to find the continuation of the story🙂 Glad I found it! That must have been quite an experience!
    Good luck with the laundry job!
    The Japanese do eat jellyfish, right? Kurage?
    PA

    • August 12, 2011 4:26 pm

      Hi PA! Thanks always for visiting.
      Yes, the Japanese eat jellyfish, although I’m embarrassed to admit that when the people at work asked me at work initially I answered no, picturing the beautiful jellyfish I once saw in an aquarium. But when I came home I realized it’s kurage and had a doh! moment.
      I always enjoy visiting your blog too, looks like you’re having some fun adventures. (It’s also a nice escape from reality for me — English and Israeli landscapes are very different!)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: