Skip to content

131

July 27, 2011

From the 365 Day Hebrew Art Project:

לקפל

Pronunciation: Leh-kah-PEL
Definition: To fold (Verb in infinitive form)

発音:レカ
意味:畳む(動詞不定形)

.
.
Folding laundry can be a soothing thing. In the chill of the air-conditioned workplace, laundry straight out of a dryer is comforting to the touch. Then it’s matching corners, aligning sides, and neatly piling up one folded item after another. When I get in to a good rhythm, it’s like a meditation. I also like the teamwork that is required for certain things. “Like a dance,” said one of my co-workers of folding sheets between two people. It really is.

I may be able to find it so because laundry has always been a house chore I didn’t mind doing, or at least didn’t mind as much as others. I don’t think there are too many people who will claim they absolutely LOVE any house chore, but everyone must have one they would choose over others. Fortunately, laundry is mine.

Back in Tokyo, there was something very satisfying about hanging my laundry out to dry on a hot, sunny day, especially if it had been a while since the weather cooperated on the weekends, the only time I could do the laundry. I always folded the dried laundry along to This American Life or another podcast. (The best way to listen to something when you really want to concentrate and absorb what you’re hearing, in my opinion.) Now I am surrounded by Hebrew chatter instead.

The South African Man who is also a newbie (he started three days before I did) claims he is also in charge of the laundry in his family, consisting of his wife and two young children.

“I just sit in front of the TV with my iron and the laundry and zone out,” he told me.

And what items of clothing, I couldn’t help asking, requires ironing living on a kibbutz, where shirt collars and buttons are extremely rare?

“Oh, I iron everything before folding them,” he answered. And by everything he meant everything: jeans, t-shirts, underwear, socks.

“Is that a South African thing?” I had to ask. Because I’ve never heard of anyone iron that obsessively in either Japan or the U.S! Maybe it is, he replied with a chuckle.

So laundry apparently is also the chore of choice for the South African Man… but I am not totally convinced, as he seems to be having some difficulty with the work. He doesn’t fold things the right way, he doesn’t remember a lot of things (that I already do despite working here less than him). I had already started sensing a lot of the grumbling and outbursts among the workers are about the South African Man but then one of them asked me one day in English, “Do you know that we’re talking most of the time about one specific person?” She didn’t have to tell me which person.

I hope the South African Man will find a way in to “the zone” he achieves with the laundry at home here as well.
.
.
洗濯物を畳む動作は時に癒しになります。エアコンが強く効いている職場で乾燥機から出たての洗濯物に触れるとほっとする。そして角と角や右と左側をぴったり合わせ、同じサイズのものをきれいに山積みにしていく。いいリズムをみつけた時は、瞑想のようです。そして、1人ではできない洗濯物があることも好きです。職場のある人が、二人で畳むシーツの過程を「ダンスみたい」と言いました。本当にそうだと思います。

こう私が思うことができるのは、洗濯が家事の中で好きなほうだからかもしれません。「好き」というのは家事なりの「好き」ですが。家事が「大好き」である人はめったにいないと思いますが、誰でも好きな順位はありますよね。幸運なことに私の一番は洗濯なのです。

東京での一人暮らし時代、カーっと晴れた日に洗濯物を干すのはなんとも快感だったのを覚えています。特に洗濯する時間があるのは週末限られているのに、なかなか晴れない週末が続いた時は。そして乾いた洗濯物をたたむにはいつも「This American Life」かほかのポッドキャストを聴きながらでした。(内容を集中して聴きたいのには最適な状況だと思います。)今はポッドキャストの代わりにヘブライ語の会話に包まれています。

私と同じく新人である(私の三日前に働き始めた)南アフリカ人男性は、自宅の洗濯も彼の責任だと教えてくれました。彼の家庭は奥さんと小さい子供二人。

「テレビの前に座って、アイロンと洗濯物を手にしながらボーっとするんだ」と彼は教えてくれました。思わず聞かずにはいられなかったのは、襟やボタン付きのシャツはめったにみないキブツに住んでいて、一体何にアイロンをかけているの?ということ。それに対して彼は、

「ああ、僕は全てにアイロンかけてから畳むんだ。」と答えました。「全て」は本当に全てみたいで、びっくりすることにジーンズやTシャツはもちろん、靴下や下着までアイロンをかけるのだそう!

私は思わず、「それって南アフリカ特有の習慣?」と聞いてしまいました。だって、日本でも多人種のアメリカでもそんな人聞いたことなかったから!そうかもね、と彼は笑いながら言いました。

彼にとっても好きな家事は洗濯のようだけど、、、仕事の様子からみると、ちょっとまだ信じられない。なぜならば彼は言われた畳み方を守らなかったり、手順や色んなことをあまり覚えていないから(後から入った私でさえもう覚えたようなことも)。職場の他の人達が時にブツブツ言ったり、会話の声がどんどん大きくなっていく内容が彼のことであることはなんとなく気付いていたけれど、ある人がある時英語で、「私たちが大半話していることは、ある特有の人だということって知ってた?」と聞いてきたのでした。「特有の人」が誰か聞く必要はありませんでした。

南ア男性が家で「ボーっと」する状態までになれるスムーズな仕事のリズムを早くみつけてほしいと思います。

Much love,
Kaori

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: