Skip to content

72 (Visa Woes | ビザ難)

December 1, 2010
tags: ,

Tourist Visa for Israel | イスラエルの観光ビザ

Can you believe it’s December already? The days seem to slip away before I know it. Speaking of which, nearly 6 months have passed since I arrived here in Israel and it was time to go extend my tourist visa once again.

This was my second extension, having successfully extended it for the first time 3 months ago.
Back then I submitted:

  • An official letter from the ulpan proving my enrollment
  • A rent contract with my name on it along with Yuval’s
  • A letter stating my reason of extension (because I wanted to study in the ulpan and also spend time with my partner Yuval)

We figured since they had already given me an extension before and had all my information, this time should be fairly easy. But easy and bureaucracy in the same sentence? Not! Especially here in Israel.

もう12月だなんて信じらますか?
知らぬうちに日々が過ぎていっている感覚の今日この頃。
ここイスラエルでの生活も約六ヶ月経過。長かったような、あっと言う間だったような、、、
そして六ヶ月と言えば、また観光ビザを延長しなければいけない時期到来です。

観光ビザは三ヶ月間有効なので、今回は二回目の延長。
前回提出した書類は:

  • ウルパンから在学を証明する正式なレター
  • ユバルと連名のアパートの契約書のコピー
  • ビザ延長を希望する理由を表記したレター(理由はウルパンで勉強したいのと、ユバルと一緒にいたいため)

前回延長をもらえたのだし、必要な情報は提出済みなので今回は比較的スムーズにいくだろうと、なんの疑いもなく内務省へ向かいました。でも「官僚組織」と「スムーズ」、この組み合わせがそう簡単に成り立つわけがありません。特にここイスラエルでは!

日本語訳へ

More than 10 days before my visa’s expiration date, Yuval and I found ourselves in the office of the Ministry of the Interior early in the morning, patiently waiting for our number to be called. I could not help notice that the man sitting at the booth right in front of us seemed very distressed, talking rapidly to the clerk, while also speaking to someone on his cellphone, which he eventually handed over to the clerk. But after a few minutes the clerk hung up the man’s cellphone, exchanged a few words with the distressed man, and the man got up from the booth shaking his head.

Then that same clerk called our number.

Still a bit taken back from the little scene played out in front of us, we sat down in the booth and Yuval explained in Hebrew that we were there to extend my tourist visa. He told her that I was planning to take a trip back to Japan within the next month or so, but the date was still to be determined. After a few exchanges Yuval turned to me and said,

“She says we have to come back 2, 3 days before your visa expires. She will not help us today.”

I just stared back at him for a moment, waiting for an additional explanation. But instead he just shrugged. I turned to the clerk and asked, “La ma (why)?”
She shrugged. And smiled faintly.

As I sat there slightly dumbfounded she proceeded to tell Yuval that when we come back we should have an exact date for my trip to Japan and that they would only extend the tourist visa until that date.

“But I thought tourist visas can be extended for up to a year,” I told Yuval as we walked out of the building. And how dare that clerk not give me an extension today “just because”! The anger started to boil up inside me.

“Maybe she was just having a bad day,” Yuval said, explaining what the distressed man before us was all about. He was from Romania and had been married to an Israeli, but was now going through a divorce. As a result he is getting kicked out of the country and was trying to prevent it.

We witnessed him failing.

“We probably just caught her (the clerk) at a bad time, after dealing with a guy like him,” suggested Yuval.

This was not the first time I felt my fate was at the mercy of some government worker and what kind of mood they were in. I was told something similar by my lawyer when I was applying for a work visa in the United States many years ago. My case wasn’t a strong one since it was my first job out of college and I didn’t have specialized skills or experience. It all came down to luck really, and my lawyer had said, let’s hope your papers end up on the desk of a happy person.

For cases like the Romanian man, there doesn’t seem to be much room for that kind of randomness. It’s pretty black and white, unfortunately for the man. Then there are cases like mine where it can be more gray, with plenty of room for bad moods or bad days to make an influence.

We returned to the office the following week, and luckily ended up at the desk of a the clerk who gave me my extension 3 months ago. No questions were asked and we were out of there in less than 10 minutes. I hope she was having one of the best days of her life!


.
.

観光ビザの期限が切れる約10日以上前に、ユバルと共に朝一に内務省へ。
番号を片手に順番が呼ばれるのを待っている間、私たちの目の前のブースに座っている男性が明らかに動揺しているのに気付かずにはいられませんでした。男性は担当者に対して必死に早口で話す傍ら、携帯電話でも誰かと話している様子。いずれ携帯電話を担当者に渡し、担当者は携帯電話の相手としばらくしゃべった後、電話を切り、男性としばらく言葉を交わしました。そして、男性は首を振りながらブースを去りました。

その同じ担当者が私の番号を呼びました。

目の前で繰り広げられたシーンに対する驚きを隠す間もなく私たちはブースに座り、ユバルがヘブライ語で私の観光ビザを延長しにきた旨を伝えました。また、私が約一、二ヶ月の間に一時帰国をする予定であるが日程はまだ決まっていないことも。しばらく彼女とやり取りをした後、ユバルは私に向かって言いました:

「観光ビザの期限が切れる2、3日前に来なさいだって。
今日は何もしてくれないって。」

私は数秒ぽかんとユバルをみつめました。何故「今日は何もしてくれない」理由を待っていたからです。でもユバルは首をかしげるだけなので私は担当者に向かって「La ma(何故)?」と聞きました。でも彼女も肩をすくめながらひそかに微笑むだけ。

私があぜんとしている間、彼女はユバルに次来る時までに私の一時帰国日を確定すること、そしてその日程までしかビザは延長しないと付け加えました。

「でも観光ビザって1年まで延長できるはずじゃないの?!」と内務省からの帰り道に私はユバルに聞きました。そしてあの担当者の態度と言ったら!特に理由もなく「今日は何もしない」なんて!怒りがこみ上げてきました。

「ただ単にタイミングが悪かっただけかもしれないよ。」とユバル。私たちの前の男性があまりにも大変だったので担当者の機嫌が悪くなった時にたまたま呼ばれてしまったのかも、と。ユバルによると男性はルーマニア人でイスラエル人と結婚していましたが離婚をすることになったため国から追い出される状況に。それをどうにか防ぐために相談にしにきていたそうです。しかし、私たちの目の前で彼は却下されてしまったのでした。

「あんな感情的な男性の直後だったから、担当者も動揺してたのかもよ。」ユバルは言いました。

このように政府機関の従業員の機嫌や精神状態に運命を左右されるような状況に立つのは実は初めてではありません。何年も前にアメリカで労働ビザを申請していた時も同じような状況でした。アメリカでは労働ビザを申請する際弁護士を通さなければいけないのですが(現在はわかりませんが当時はそうでした)、大学卒業後初の就職だったのもあり私は特別なスキルや職務経験はほとんどなく、弁護士は「運の問題」と言っていました。私の書類がとても機嫌の良い従業員の机に届くといいね、と。

ルーマニア人の男性のような状況はこのような機嫌の良さなどによるランダムな影響はあまりないような気がします。男性にとっては気の毒ですが白黒はっきりしているような印象。しかし私のような状況は逆にグレーでほんのささいなことが影響される可能性がある。

翌週、言われた通り再び内務省へ。今回はラッキーなことに三ヶ月前の延長一回目の時の従業員にあたりました。質問をされることもなく10分もしないうちにパスポートに新しいビザが貼られ、終了。彼女にとっ、最高に素敵な一日でありましたように!

Much love,
Kaori

2 Comments leave one →
  1. December 3, 2010 3:27 pm

    Congratulations on getting the extension! My appointment is next week, finally — they also wouldn’t agree to see me until the day before my current visa is set to expire. Fingers crossed!

    • December 3, 2010 6:16 pm

      Thanks Katie! Just read up on your immigration journey… wow! I feel very lucky now that the Japanese embassy does the police record (or background checks) for us. Good luck next week – I am keeping my fingers crossed for you!!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: