Skip to content

157 (Art Gallery | アート・ギャラリー)

December 2, 2011

Photo by Ammar Younis

Self portrait by Fatma Abu Rumi

Yuval and I visited the Umm el-Fahem Art Gallery a few days ago. What left the strongest impression on me was not the artwork, or the gallery, or the town it was in. It was our guide.

She was a young Arab Israeli woman, I’m guessing in her 20’s. Her head was covered in a turquoise headscarf, and her long-sleeved dress reached all the way down to the floor. Of the various levels of dress I’ve seen Muslim women in, hers was on the very traditional side, and it strangely made me feel insecure all of a sudden, perhaps because I felt under dressed or under protected compared to her.

I also found myself wondering if she would even look at Yuval, a man, and furthermore Jewish, in the eye, but all of this nervous wonder was quickly evaporated by her friendliness and approachable nature.

As we strolled around the gallery she told us about how she took a photography class with one of the exhibited artists, Ammar Younis, whose portrait series featuring donkeys were at times comical and sometimes tragic, often fascinating, and some just stunning. She explained the background of painter Fatma Abu Rumi’s work, which were mainly self portraits as well as a series of teddy bear portraits. The artist is drawn to teddy bears, our guide explained, because they are eventually abandoned and forgotten, the same way the artist feels as a woman.

From the chatter in between guidance, we learned that our guide is currently studying Communications near Tel Aviv. Here was a young Arab Muslim woman, going to school for what she wants to study, trying photography classes, and talking openly about feminism. Very different from the typical portrayal of Arab Muslim women that is prominent in the mainstream media today.

What drew me to the gallery almost as equally as the art was its location. I have passed by its town of Umm el-Fahem and its greater surrounding Wadi Ara area countless times. The highway to Tel Aviv passes through it, and every time I enter the 17 kilometer stretch of mainly Arab villages, I would look up at the multi-storied mansions with glittery walls and blue windows perched on the highest points aligning the highway (completed or under construction – there always seems to be an equal amount of each), pick out mosques with towers that light up in green neon at night, and squint at the roads and houses that dissolve in to one another in the distance, all a world of mystery. I got to take a tiny peek of that world the other day.

I’m looking forward to returning to the gallery in April, when the new exhibition will extend in to a few homes near the museum. I wasn’t able to take any photos this time, but I highly recommend the museum’s website, as well as the photographer Ammar Younis’ website if you want to see his stunning photos. I first learned of this gallery through an article in ISRAELITY.

先日Umm el-Fahem Art Gallery(ウム・エルファヘム・アート・ギャラリー)に行って来ました。
最も印象に残ったのは、アートでも、ギャラリーでも、ギャラリーのある町でもなく、
無料で解説をしてくれたガイドさんでした。

彼女は若いアラブ系イスラエル人女性。(年は恐らく20代と予想)
頭はターコイス色のスカーフで包まれ、長袖のドレスは日本の学校の制服のような素材で、
首から足元まですっぽり全身が隠れるようなものでした。
イスラム系の女性のあらゆる服装を今までにみてきましたが、
彼女のスタイルはかなり保守的なほう。
目の前にして、突然緊張というか不安になる自分がいました。
彼女に比べて自分が隠れきれてないからか、
それともきちんとしてないと感じたからか、わかりませんが。

そのような保守的な服装の彼女が、男性でしかもユダヤ人であるユバルと
目さえ合わせてくれるのかな?なんていう疑問も正直浮かんだのですが、
不安感は彼女のフレンドリーさと親しみやすさであっという間になくなったのでした。

写真家Ammar Younis(アマール・ユニス)さんのロバが必ず登場するポートレート集は、
時にコミカルで、時に悲劇的で、とても興味深く、本当に素晴らしい作品もいくつかありました。
ガイドさんは一度アマールさんの写真のクラスを受けたことがあることを話してくれました。

主に自画像と、くまのぬいぐるみをテーマにした作品が展示されていた
アーティストFatma Abu Rumi(ファトゥマ・アブ・ルミ)さんの作品の背景も話しくれ、
彼女がくまのぬいぐるみに魅かれるのはいずれ忘れられ放棄されてしまうのがほとんどで、
女性として共感できるから、とのことでした。

案内の合間の会話の中で、ガイドさんは現在テルアビブ近くの学校で
メディアの勉強をしていることも教えてくれました。
このように彼女は好きなことを勉強し、写真のクラスをとってみたり、
フェミニズムのことをとてもオープンに話したりと、
多くのメディアで主流の「アラブ系イスラム女性」の印象とは全然違いました。

このギャラリーにアートと同じぐらい魅かれた理由は、場所。
今までにギャラリーがあるウム・エルファヘムの町と、
町が一部であるヴァディ・アラという地域の前を通り過ぎた回数は数えきれないくらい。
テルアビブへの高速道路がヴァディ・アラの真ん中を通るので、
毎回約17キロの距離に広がるこの地域に入るたびに
高い位置に次々と建てられたラメ入りの壁とブルーの窓の数階建ての大豪邸を見上げたり、
夜になるとグリーンの灯りがライトアップされるモスクを数えたりと、
私にとって謎である世界を遠くから眺めていたのでした。
先日、その謎の世界をちょっとだけのぞけた気がしました。

来年の4月には、今までにはないギャラリー近辺に住むご家庭の家数軒でも
アートを展示するそうなので、今から楽しみにしています。
今回写真は撮れなかったのですが、ギャラリーのホームページはお薦めです。
また、ロバの写真が展示されていた写真家Ammar Younisさんの
ホームページにて彼の写真をみることができます。
私がこのギャラリーのことを知ったのはISRAELITYというコミュニティーブログのこの記事でした。

Much love,
Kaori

About these ads
2 Comments leave one →
  1. Sammi Moe permalink
    December 5, 2011 2:55 am

    It’s hard to get past our preconceived notions about people sometimes. But one on one we see that we are all very much alike in many ways, with dreams, goals, and ideas. Even if we do not look the same, we all have flesh, blood, bones, and brains. But most important, we all have a heart.
    I am still loving reading about your adventures, and hope you will turn this into a book!
    Sending you virtual hugs!
    Sammi

    • December 6, 2011 7:11 pm

      I agree with you, I believe deep down we all have much more in common with one another than we think.

      I’m learning to be more understanding towards the preconceived notions people seem to have about me by acknowledging that I too have notions about people. It’s still challenging sometimes!

      Thank you always for reading Sammi and big hugs to you too! xo
      Kaori

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 57 other followers

%d bloggers like this: